Michelle Piotrowski Design
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Aeriwand Vacuum

In this senior studio, we were given the opportunity to design any product we wanted too. I noticed that most vacuums were too large, while smaller vacuums could not reach the tiny corners or crevices that food crumbs, hair, or bugs would fall in to. I wanted to design a vacuum that could be used for "precision." A vacuum to reach areas where we typically wouldn't clean, such as the metal tracks car seats sit on or the crumbs that fall into the cracks of our keyboard as were eating lunch. My roommate, who was meticulous about keeping our apartment clean, inspired me to design the Aeriwand vacuum.

 

In this senior studio, we were given the opportunity to design any product. My roommate, who was meticulous about keeping our apartment clean, inspired me to design the Aeriwand. The 180-degree rotatable wand is perfect for annoyingly hard-to-reach areas like in-between car seats or within the spaces between keys on your keyboard. The Aeriwand vacuum offers expert precision for collecting dust, hair, food crumbs, tiny bugs and more.





Most of the miniature vacuums currently on the market were advertised as "keyboard cleaners." The gimmicky appearance of the products projects a sense of humor, but the poor quality of the design, use of materials, and purpose of the product, demonstrates they're not meant to be taken seriously. 



Within the ideation process, different mediums were used to convey my ideas. The focus was on creating an aesthetically pleasing product with functional features geared towards minimizing the size of the vacuum. These design goals in combination with ease-of-use and accessibility, would make this an effective product on the market. I worked between creating quick 3D models in Solidworks, to sketching and improving these ideas on paper. Foam models were created with the lathe tool to figure out size and form, while working with a piece of clay helped achieve the final design form. Each rendering below is the actual 3D printed model to scale, rendered within Photoshop to add any final details. 

By using electrostatic induction to pick up hair on furniture or clothing, the Aeriwand vacuum becomes a multi-purpose device that can used in a wide range of settings. To test the theory out, the vacuum nozzle was 3-D printed. With the vacuum powered on, would the debris disperse out of the metal induction plate holes?

Special thanks to my professor John Kaloustian for teaching me new skills and encouraging me throughout the semester.